One More Item of More Importance…

Regardless of George Mason, this is a policy year like none other for the Selection Committee. The perceived “weak bubble,” whatever that may be, has given rise to the greatest number of discussions in my memory of what “deserve” means in terms of an at large berth.

We’ve never seen a greater collection of 18-12 major conference teams put head-to-head against 24-7 mid major teams. And, they are battling each other.

San Diego State, Creighton, St. Mary’s, New Mexico, Mason, etc. Or, Maryland, Arizona, Auburn, Florida, Pick a Big Ten Team, etc.

Keep an eye on the number SIX. Though I don’t necessarily buy it, that is what many say is the official mid major at large quota.

The other thing to keep an eye on: the rationale for “in” and “out.” My beef has always been the committee picks and chooses its criteria for inclusion or exclusion, doling what I believe to be excuses, not explanations.

The main question that I’ve never really heard asked, nor answered: which is better, 2-4 against the top 50, or 5-12? I cringe when a Maryland or Arizona is included because of five top 50 wins.

And if we end up at six mid major at large bids? I’ll not likely buy the word “coincidence.”

Side note: if Davidson makes the field, the selection process if officially a sham.

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~ by mglitos on March 14, 2009.

5 Responses to “One More Item of More Importance…”

  1. George Mason has three top 100 wins – against #91, #95 and #99. Davidson, while I agree they probably don’t belong in it, did at least beat #21 West Virginia at a neutral site (I know Ruoff was out, but so was Gosselin). Their only bad loss (Citadel) was without Curry, and four of their seven losses are to teams in the RPI top 30 (#2 Duke, #5 Oklahoma, #23 Butler, #30 Purdue). Mason has dreadful losses to Hampton, Liberty and Delaware.

    If I’m on the committee, Davidson is WAY, WAY in front of Mason on the list, despite the RPI difference. Sorry. I need more than an RPI number – I need to see something on the resume and Mason has nothing. Davidson only has one quality win (since N.C. State turned out to be garbage this year), but they offset it with no bad losses (with Curry). Mason has no quality wins, and three bad losses.

    Davidson’s last hope probably slipped away when West Virginia didn’t win the Big East – a win over the BE champion could have kept them on the table a little longer.

  2. Michael – Thank you for the coverage of the CAA.

    Read your blog all year and checked my blackberry all weekend. Good luck to your team, not sure when you can switch over from blogger to fan but there is no better time to be a fan than now when your team made the Dance.

    Summers -I don’t think Mason is even a consideration, not with the school, the students, the fans nor the media.

    The NIT is the question and while the odds look good you never know – here’s hoping for one more home game!

  3. I think Mason is an NIT lock, just not in the NCAA picture.

    Alas, the CAA looks like a two-bid league this year – one NCAA and one NIT.

  4. So, Litos…what do you think of ONLY four mid-major, non-power conference bids?

  5. This is the most boring bracket I’ve seen in many many years.

    It’s clear the NCAA is concerned about selling tickets in a down economy.

    How else do you explain a #8 seeded Ohio State team playing what amounts to a home game against Siena in Dayton. No, Dayton isn’t Columbus, but that’s like saying Duke or UNC don’t get an advantage in Charlotte or Greensborow.

    How do you rationalize sending Villanova to Philadelphia – where they play 3 home games a year on the same floor?

    The NCAA Committee’s message this year was a big middle finger to the mids.

    I also think this year’s selections may be the beginning of the end of the Bracket Buster. I don’t think anything came of it, except for a couple of games on TV.

    I’d rather play a couple more OOC’s (NOT CAA games, Mr. Double Round Robin), to make things more interesting.

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